Saturday, January 16, 2016

Listen: Hot Takes from Oscar, Holy Esque and SPINX

You've got two packages of hot tortillas and need to burn through them quick. Have no fear, here's the music that will keep you out of jail:

The infectious and rambunctious "Sometimes" pretty much exists in the same place that most of Oscar's other work does. It features music that is driven by a jangly, live-wire indie pop sound and backed up by sneering synths. It differs from his previous work in one large way. In "Sometimes," Oscar invites a female aboard to provide some additional vocals. I love the resulting back and forth that comes because of this additional voice. It burns. Or if you are in America right now, Berns. "Sometimes" comes from Oscar's hotly anticipated debut LP, Cut and Paste, which is set for a May release on Wichita Recordings.



When I listened to the new Holy Esque album (At Hope's Ravine) two track's stood out to me (aside from the three that I had previously posted). The opener "Prism" and number eight "Tear." It didn't surprise me much when Holy Esque chose to release "Tear" as their first 2016 single. As singer Pat Hynes points out the track is a "vital live favorite" and is important one for understanding the band. It features two of the central themes from At Hope's Ravine, darkness vs light and hope. "Tear" looks at the ever-constant fears and woes that exist in everyday life and holds them up to the hope of something better. It hints at escapism and pursuing better things.



When I heard SPINX's "Playing House" I immediately recognized there was something familiar and comforting with its slowed down electro-magic dance pop. But I was only five emails in to a stash of 180 so I didn't worry too much about it, I just starred it and moved on. Now, as I relisten to "Playing House," I realize that the familiarity comes from a band I posted a bunch of tracks from back in 2012, La Chansons. So why would two bands, four years apart, sound so similar? Because they are the same thing. SPINX is the updated version of the band (updated meaning the name change). The husband and wife duo began performing under La Chansons during their college years. Over the ten year period that La Chansons existed, a lot of things changed. Sometime last year it quite making sense to have the same band name. So Greg and Carson decided to rename themselves SPINX (in honor of Carson's maiden name). Check out the latest from the band "Playing House":