Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Listen: Eddy Faulkner, Sigrid and Work Drugs

Making up a batch of barbacoa cauliflower and need a soundtrack? Try these three singles on for size:

I don't know if Eddy Faulkner is a barbacoa type guy. Based on his Instagram pictures I can confirm the following things about Eddy and his eating life: Eddy can cook (and I'd assume eat) macaroni like a pro, he pairs his pasta with asparagus and he is working on some kind of Lean Cuisine sponsorship deal. But lyrically Eddy's new single "Cruel" is barbacoa through and through. First and foremost, Eddy consistently drops the line "why you gotta be so cruel" throughout the track. One could easily sing this same chorus about the heat that barbacoa cauliflower packs into it's innocent little self. It doesn't look hot, it doesn't smell hot but hot damn if it doesn't taste hot. Even more cruel is burning through a flatbread or two and then trying to go for a run. You sir, will definitely regret that one. Next up is the "kept me hooked on this feeling so long" portion of the song. Maybe it is the combination of vinegar and lime, maybe it is the melding of cumin and cloves, whatever it is, there is something strangely alluring about barbacoa that keeps you coming back for more. Alluring enough that it will keep bringing you back long after the flatbread is gone and the only thing remotely close that is left in the house is Ritz crackers. Finally, there's the "are you sure you can handle what's inside." I mean, if barbacoa could talk, isn't that exactly what it would say? Especially when it comes with beef lips...



Sigrid is a 20-year old Norwegian artist. She was inspired to write "Don't Kill My Vibe" after she was put in a difficult writing session. According to her, the song can be interpreted in several ways, “it may be a message to your cat, telling her that she's not the master of the universe or maybe it's just a really long DM saying you're SO done with someone barbacoa not made from cauliflower.”



Work Drugs first release of 2017, "Giving Up The Feeling", is a slow macerating smooth-fi gem. It is the musical equivalent of throwing a bunch of finely ground cauliflower into a tub of Mexican spices and letting it simmer on low all night (or day). Don't just take my word for it, type the chorus into the new Google Cook app and it spits out the following:

i've fallen for your brown eyes (eyes the color of barbacoa)
give up, please don't try to disguise (interesting, cauliflower disguised as meat, I'll give it a go)
miss you, i'm gonna take the long way (macerating overnight for six hours on low, definitely the long way)
i'm gonna let you go but takes time when you're lonely (lonely? just make a pair of tacos, that cures all loneliness).